Rumours of new Xenophobic Attacks in South Africa

South African NGO Lesidi La Batho is helping to build understanding between refugees and the local community.

South African NGO Lesidi La Batho is helping to build understanding between refugees and the local community.

Rumours of new attacks in 2009

In late May 2009, reports emerged regarding a possible resurgence of xenophobic related activity and the organising of attacks in the Western Cape. Reports of threats and secret meetings by local businessmen surfaced in Gugulethu, Khayelitsha and Philippi, Cape Town. Samora Machel in Philippi once again emerging as a flash-point.[55] In Gugulethu, reports emerged of secret meetings by local businessmen discussing ‘what to do about Somali shopkeepers’. The Anti-Eviction Campaign brought these issues to the open by organising a series of anti-xenophobia meetings attempting to find the root cause of the crisis.

Rumours of new attacks in 2010

In 2010 the press carried numerous articles claiming that there would be massive planned xenophobic violence at the end of the 2010 Football World Cup. However this did not happen.

New Attacks in 2012

In July 2012 there were new attacks in parts of Cape Town and in Botshabelo in the Free State.

‘Fortress South Africa’

South Africa’s borders have been remilitarized. According to Christopher McMichael:

“This shared state-corporate project of building up a ‘fortress South Africa’ also reveals a deeply entrenched seam of xenophobia, in which undocumented migrants and refugees from African countries are painted as a security risk akin to terrorism and organised crime. Parliamentary discussions on border security are rife with claims that foreign nationals are attempting to drain social grants and economic opportunities from citizens. The packaging of illegal immigration as a national security threat, which often relies on unsubstantiated claims about the inherent criminality of foreign nationals, provides an official gloss on deeply entrenched governmental xenophobia, in which African immigrants are targets for regular harassment, rounding up and extortion by the police. This normalisation of immigrants as figures of resentment may also fuel outbreaks of xenophobic violence.”

Gepos Bon Carolyne Ahiambo Ngara vlugtelinge in Suid-Afrika

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